Tag: Puzzles

Puzzle Books For Adults Gifts, Fun, Pastimes, Xmas, Secret Santa

Kids get plenty of fun from puzzle books, they get plenty of brain training too. Do you like puzzles? Most adults enjoy having a bit of time to themselves and relaxing with a puzzle or two. It keeps the mind sharp while still allowing you to relax in peace and quiet.

If you are looking for a birthday gift for a friend, or something to keep someone entertained while they are ill, then a puzzle book can be a good idea, to keep someone busy and happy for hours.

Don’t know what kind of puzzles they enjoy?

Get a book of mixed puzzles for adults.

The different kinds of puzzles provide maximum brain training and fun.

Someone with poor eyesight? buy a puzzle book with extra large print.

Puzzle books can also be good choices at Christmas for Secret Santa gifts. They suit either sex, so you can buy them in advance, knowing that it will not matter which work colleague you need to buy a Secret Santa gift for.

Mixed Puzzles For Adults

This book contains a mix of puzzles. Its size is 6 inches by 9 inches, so it is more of a pocket size book and it contains 142 pages of puzzles and answers with 5 different types of puzzle. These include easy level Sudoku, Anagrams (word scrambles), Word Matches, Word Searches and Cryptograms (code breaking). The difficulty level ranges from easy (word matches) to challenging (cryptograms), so you will be able to find something to enjoy whether you are buzzing with ideas or needing a quiet five minute break from a hectic lifestyle. All puzzles include the answers.

More Mixed Puzzles For Adults.

This is a larger size book, 8.5 inches by 11 inches, US letter size and has large text, so it is also suitable for someone who needs large print books. It has 130 pages, with 100 puzzles in the book, including the perennial favorites of Sudoku (easy and medium) anagrams (word scrambles), word matches, Word Searches and cryptograms (code breaking) as well as some new puzzles: Shikaku, doublet, mazes and filomino. The overall difficulty level ranges from easy (word matches) to challenging (cryptograms), Answers are all provided.

Glossary of Sudoku


Image by/from LithiumFlash

Sudoku terms

The terms given here are based on a 9 X 9 sudoku grid, though the game can also be played with a 4 X 4 grid, a 6 X 6 grid and even bigger grids. Some sizes of grids have different shapes.

Grid

A 9 X 9 Sudoku grid has 9 rows, 9 columns and 9 boxes or blocks.

That means that every row, every column and every block has 9 cells. There are 81 cells in total in a 9 X 9 Sudoku grid.

Boxes Or Blocks

Boxes or blocks are shown with thicker lines to make them clearer.

Sudoku Rules

  1. Every row contains one and only one of the 9 symbols used, eg the numbers 1 through 9.
  2. Every column contains one and only one of the 9 symbols used
  3. Every block (or box) contains one and only one of the 9 symbols used.

Proper Sudoku

This means that the given puzzle has only one correct solution.

Playing Sudoku

A Sudoku puzzle is one that presents the player with a grid containing some numbers. There should be enough numbers (clues) included to ensure that the sudoku puzzle is a “proper sudoku”, that is, it has only one correct solution. The aim is to complete the grid so it includes all the symbols / numbers, following the 3 rules. So, only one of each symbol in any row, column or block.

 

Sudoku

https://www.puzzles.mythsoftime.com/Sudoku is a logic-based game in which symbols are placed in a grid, following 3 basic rules. While the numbers 1 through 9 are the symbols most often used, this is for convenience. No maths is involved. The symbols could be anything, for instance, letters or shapes or colors, as long as there are 9 different variations that can be easily distinguished.

The aim is to fill a 9×9 grid with the chosen symbols so that every column, row, and block contains all of the symbols once and once only. There must be no duplicates.

Sudoku puzzles are presented as partially completed grids and the aim is to find the solution. There should always be only one single correct solution for any particular sudoku puzzle.

Variations of Sudoku puzzles have been around since the 19th century, published in French newspapers.

It is thought that playing Sudoku regularly may improve the working memory in older people. (Ref: Sudoku and Working Memory Performance for Older Adults: Jeremy W. Grabbe)

While 9 X 9 grids, with 81 cells, using symbols such as the numbers 1 to 9 are the most common form of Sudoku puzzles, it is also possible to play with 4 X 4 and 6 X 6 grids and also larger grids. There are also various kinds of different shaped grid puzzles. This site will concentrate on the basic 4 X 4, 6 X 6 and 9 X 9 grids.

The answer to this Sudoku puzzle can be found on the answers page

Sudoku solving algorithms


Image by/from Simpsons contributor

There are 81 cells in a standard 9 X 9 Sudoku grid. There are also 9 boxes (blocks or regions). These are formed where the first, center or last rows cross the first, center and last columns and are outlined with thicker borders.

In general, the numbers 1 through 9 are used as the symbols to fill each of the 81 cells in the grid.

3 Rules

  1. Each row may only contain a symbol once.
  2. Each column may only contain a symbol once.
  3. Each block or box may only contain a symbol once.

There must be no repeats in any row, column or blocks.

A Sudoku puzzle is presented with some cells containing numbers (or other symbols). These are clues that will enable you to use the 3 rules to solve the empty cells. A proper Sudoku has only one solution.

It is possible to use computer algorithms to solve Sudokus. These may also be used to study the properties of Sudokus and make new puzzles.

The animation above shows a Sudoku puzzle being solved with a “brute force” algorithm – one method of using computers to solve these puzzles. The red numbers are the ones that were provided when the puzzle was set and these are fixed. The empty cells fill with alternatives as the algorithm tests possible solutions.

If the algorithm finds that the path it has set out on does not follow the 3 rules as it gets further down the Sudoku, it may discard all the previously found numbers and start all over again. Sometimes, humans have to do that too!